9/11

This week marks 21 years since the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The experiences and images of that day remain a collective trauma for many people across the United States.

The Four S’s Of Resiliency

Creating a plan on how to adapt can help one feel more capable to embrace and bounce back from changes and/or challenges. When recognizing how one has navigated these in the past, a greater sense of ability may arise.

Grounding With The Senses

Amidst the day-to-day rhythm of life, it is common for people to feel like they are living from the shoulders up, being tuned into thoughts and worries more than the body.

A Meditation for Setting Boundaries

Holiday Stress Meditation

Mindfulness Exercise to Prepare for Difficult Conversations

To put it simply, boundaries are a way to understand how we relate to ourselves and other people. Individuals can have boundaries that range from rigid, to healthy, to porous, and oftentimes someone’s boundaries can be different depending on the context. For example, someone with healthy boundaries around their time may have rigid emotional boundaries. MyTherapistAid.com offers a comprehensive overview of the characteristics of each boundary type.

Remembering Important Dates

Remembering Important Dates: Acknowledging the important dates in loved ones’ lives can help you strengthen your relationships by showing them that you care about them. Important dates can include birthdays, anniversaries, difficult milestones, big job interviews, or a medical appointment. There are a lot of different ways to keep track of these dates, and finding a system that works for you can help you stay on top of important dates. Some ideas include using an online or paper calendar, creating reminders on one (or more) of your devices, or post-it notes around your house. It may also be helpful to think about how you want to acknowledge the date (e.g., sending a text, giving a gift, etc).

Navigating Difficult Relationships FAST

he acronym, FAST, comes from dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), and it describes how to promote self-respect while navigating challenging relationship situations:

F – Fair, show fairness to yourself and the other person.

A – Apologize and take responsibility only when appropriate.

S – Stick to your values to preserve your sense of integrity

T – Truthful, be truthful and avoid bending the truth (e.g., exaggerating, acting helpless)

For more information, visit https://www.optimumperformanceinstitute.com/dbt-treatment/dbt-fast-skills-explained/