Men’s Mental Health Week 2021

Awareness, prevention, education, and treatment are key aspects for mental health wellness. For men, factors such as social norms, reluctance to seek help, stigma, lack of culturally-competent care, or minimization of symptoms can make it difficult to get treatment for these common mental health problems that are prevalent among men.

Short and Long-Term Costs of Binge-Drinking Related to Heavy Alcohol Use

Binge-drinking is defined as 5 or more drinks for males and 4 or more drinks in females, in about a 2- hour period. Heavy alcohol use can cause serious long-lasting damage. The good news is that these consequences can be preventable.

Social Drinking: Moderation Vs. Being At-Risk for an Alcohol Use Disorder

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism (NIAAA), a standard drink (or alcoholic drink-equivalent) in the US contains 0.6 fl ounces of pure alcohol. Here is what this would look like:

Being Mindful and Compassionate in Tough Conversations

Tough conversations often create discomfort and can lead to avoidance. There may be reluctance to speak up due to fear of consequences. What will people think? How do I manage my own anxiety? Consider for a moment that remaining silent during tough conversations also communicates a message. What message do you wish to convey?

CARE-ing for a Friend/ Family Member who is Misusing Drugs or Alcohol

Caring for a loved one struggling with the mental and physical reliance on substances can be a very painful experience, especially for those who experience the effects first-hand. Substance use impacts the entire family system; therefore it is important to have support at all steps along the way–from the time of emerging concerns to treatment and recovery. Knowing what to do is not always easy, especially when watching a loved one engage in self-defeating behavior.

Post-Treatment… What life looks like now

You officially completed treatment…congratulations! Now what? Like other areas of life where one completes a task, there are steps necessary to maintain positive results.

Connect with the Celebration of Recovery!

Did you know that Minnesota is also known as “Minnesober” or “The Land of 10,000 Treatment Centers?!”

PLEASE MASTER : Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

PLEASE MASTER is a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) skill to help reduce vulnerability to negative emotions. This is a great skill to help with emotional regulation while also having a framework for steps to take that create healthy habits within daily routines. 

Substance Use in Attorneys

As an attorney managing a stressful caseload you may result in coping strategies to help manage your stress. One of the most common coping strategies is substance use. If you feel like you have begun to use negative coping strategies therapy is a great option to help you get back on track.

Mental health, addiction treatment important amid crisis

It’s no surprise that people are feeling anxious right now.

Workers are worrying about how they’ll pay the rent as hours are cut back. Young parents are trying to do their jobs remotely while watching their children who are home from school. Older people are weighing the health risks of making a quick run to the grocery store.

Most people’s lives have been turned upside down by the coronavirus.

As Congress takes action to keep our economy strong and our people healthy, we can’t forget those who far too often have been left behind – people who are living with mental illness and those struggling with addiction.

It’s estimated that 1 in 5 people in our country are living with mental illness or substance use disorders. Sadly, people with mental illness and people with substance use disorders may fail to get the treatment they need in a typical year. And as we know, this year is anything but typical.

We know that people who misuse opioids are at high risk for coronavirus. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other health experts, opioids impact the respiratory and pulmonary health of users and make them more susceptible to respiratory infections, including coronavirus.

People who are living with a mental illness or addiction often have other health conditions that make them more likely to suffer severe complications from the coronavirus.

Responding to the coronavirus pandemic requires a comprehensive health care strategy, including increasing access to community mental health and addiction treatment services. And the best way we can do that is to include the expansion of Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics in the next emergency package passed by Congress.

Six years ago, we worked together to pass our Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Act. It created quality standards of care and funding to open community clinics that are transforming mental health and addiction treatment.

After only two years of operations, communities that have CCBHCs are providing life-saving services. They work closely with law enforcement and our schools and coordinate with hospitals to dramatically reduce emergency room visits.

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, they’ve led to a 60% decrease in time spent in jails, a 41% decrease in homelessness and a 63% decrease in emergency department visits for behavioral health. That’s a big deal when every hospital bed matters right now.

CCBHCs also are well-positioned to support those struggling to cope with the stress of coronavirus, whether it’s anxiety, depression, loneliness brought on by social isolation or even trauma faced by front-line health care workers. And many CCBHCs provide telemedicine services, allowing people to access help without increasing their potential exposure to the virus.

As our nation confronts COVID-19, we must not leave those with mental illness and addiction disorders behind. And the good news is, by working together, we can make sure that doesn’t happen.

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