CARE Counseling Listed In Lavender Magazines Pride Pages Directory

CARE Counseling Listed In Lavender Magazines Pride Pages Directory

Self-Injury Awareness

Self Injury Awareness

There are behaviors that we tend to keep hidden from others due to shame, embarrassment, anxiety, stigma, or fear. This month, I would like to increase awareness of self-injury, which is especially prevalent among teens and college students. Self-injury includes deliberate acts of harm on one’s body that are typically done in an attempt to help relieve intentse emotional pain that has become overwhelming. Forms of self-injury include skin cutting, burning, scratching, piercing/ puncturing the skin as well as hitting/ punching self, or head-banging. Although the intent to cause serious harm is typically not the goal, it is certainly a possibility and therefore should not be treated lightly.

Individuals who engage in self-injury tend to struggle with expressing emotions, regulating emotions, and coping with distress. They may feel lonely, worthless, alone, or rejected. For those who struggle with accepting or loving their self, self-injury may be a way to punish themselves. Individuals may feel anxiety/ panic and out-of-control, wanting distraction. For some people, self-injury helps relieve tension associated with anxiety, anger, or frustration. For others, self-injury serves as an escape to feelings of numbness.

The signs and symptoms of self-injury are often hidden and done in private. For example, self-injurious behaviors tend to take place when friends/ family members are sleeping or not at home. Injuries such as cuts, scratches, burns, or scarring may be covered by long sleeve clothing or done on places of the body such as the torso or thighs. It is so important to reach out and talk to someone such as a trusted friend, family member, or community support. It is also important to consult and seek help from a professional in the medical or mental health field. If you are concerned about someone who engages in self-injury here are some ways to help:

How to Help Someone Who Self-Injures

  • Increase awareness of self-injury.
  • Listen in a caring, supportive, and nonjudgmental manner.
  • Encourage use of healthy coping skills to help build resilience.
  • Take talk and behaviors of self-injury as serious.
  • Increase social connections.
  • Assist with locating or suggesting people who can help. Resources include a pediatrician or school counselor (for children), primary care physician, mental health professional, spiritual/faith-based leader, or supportive friend/ family member.
  • Call 911 or to seek help for life-threatening injuries or suicide attempt.
  • Reach out to your local crisis recourses or contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

It takes a big step of courage to reach out. My hope is that individuals who engage in self-injury can feel comfortable to seek support by getting treatment to help learn healthier coping strategies.  Please join others as they speak up and seek help during Self-Injury Awareness Month. Your collective voice is so important as we work together to help reduce the stigma.

Written By: Charlotte Johnson, MA, LPCC


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The professionals at CARE are actively collecting and creating resources to help with what you need. We’re Here for You.

Zero Discrimination Day

Zero Discrimination Day

Zero Discrimination Day is celebrated around the world on March 1st to promote equality and help end discrimination. Discrimination is defined by unjust or biased treatment of individuals because they are part of a certain group based on factors such as the following:

  • Race, Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity
  • Religion
  • Heath Status, Disability
  • Socioeconomic, Familial Status

Discrimination not only affects one’s physical and mental health, but also impacts important areas of life such as social and occupational functioning.

There is a need to raise awareness, take action, and call out discrimination. At CARE, we recognize the health disparities in mental health as well as stigma that still exits for many people to receive mental health treatment. We also recognize the need for systemic change within the mental health community. That is why CARE MORE was created.

WHAT IS CARE MORE?

CARE more is a non-profit community initiative created by CARE Counseling for the purpose of creating systemic change within the mental health community. CARE’s owners, John Hutchinson and Dr. Andrea Hutchinson, created CARE with the mission statement of: build a community to strengthen the community.

Despite the needs, only one in three Black or African American adults who need mental health care receive it. 

There are reasons that members of the BIPOC community avoid seeking therapy. Reluctance to enlist the aid of a mental health professional can include a lack of representation.

In Minnesota, 95% of mental health professionals are white; just over 2% are Black. Nationally it isn’t much better sitting at 4%.

With the goal of continuing to strengthen the mental health community through CARE more, the Hutchinson Family Endowment is donating $50,000 to the University of St. Thomas to fund the cost of books for BIPOC students pursuing masters and doctoral programs in the Psychology Department. Through the CARE more initiative, more BIPOC students will succeed in Psychology programs and pursue careers in therapy, which will encourage more people of color to find help from clinicians who can truly understand their racial struggles. If you are interested in showing your support for the mission behind CARE more, you can purchase swag at www.CAREmoremn.com

HELP AVAILABLE AT CARE COUNSELING

If you are struggling with your mental health, reach out for help. CARE is an outpatient e-counseling mental health clinic whose clinicians work with children of all ages, adults, couples, and families. CARE Counseling offers same week availability and has many clinicians accepting new clients. All Major Minnesota Health Insurance Companies are accepted, including Medical Assistance, which covers 100% of outpatient mental health costs. To schedule an appointment, call 612.223.8898 or schedule online with our portal at www.care-clinics.com.

The Center for Disease Control lists specific examples for types of discrimination as well as protections that are offered with federal and US labor laws to read more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/eeo/faqs/discrimination.htm

Written By: Charlotte Johnson, MA, LPCC



We’re Here to help


Our wellness experts will be happy to take care of you. You can CLICK HERE to schedule an appointment now or call (612)223-8898.




Meet Clinicians


We’re united by our commitment to providing effective, relevant, and innovative mental health support at all stages of your journey. Click Here to find out more about who we are, where we come from, and how we live out CARE’s mission every day.





The professionals at CARE are actively collecting and creating resources to help with what you need. We’re Here for You.

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