Intimate Partner Violence

The APA states that 1 in 3 women and more than 1 in 4 men have experienced some form of intimate partner violence in their lifetime

Intimate partner violence, also called domestic violence, occurs between people in an intimate relationship. It can take many forms including, controlling behavior, emotional abuse, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. Intimate partner violence can occur between not only adults, but also within teen relationships as well as in the LGBTQ community.

Examples of Abuse

Physical violence (e.g., hitting, biting, pinching, hair pulling, choking, pushing, burning, using weapons, slamming head against something)

Sexual violence (e.g., being forced into sexual acts, being pressured into sexual acts, unwanted sexual contact)

Coercion or threats (e.g., threatening to harm you, themselves, or others, threatening to “out” you)

Signs of domestic abuse

You might be experiencing domestic abuse if your partner:

Uses intimidating, hurtful words and behaviors to control you

Calls you names, insults you, or puts you down

Prevents or discourages you from going to work or school or seeing family members or friends

Tries to control how you spend your money, where you go, what medicines you take, or what you wear

Treatment at CARE

Learn what differentiates healthy, unhealthy, and abusive relationships

Learn effective ways of communication

Learn coping skills

Learn about boundaries

COMMON occurrences during domestic abuse

EXAMPLES OF DOMESTIC ABUSE

  • Stalking (e.g., pattern of harassing or threatening tactics that is unwanted and causes fear or safety concerns)
  • Intimidation (e.g., making you afraid by using looks, gestures, and actions)
  • Emotional abuse (e.g., putting you down, playing mind games)
  • Isolation (e.g., limiting who you talk to, saying no one will believe you)
  • Denying, minimizing, blaming (e.g., saying the abuse didn’t happen, saying you “made” them abuse you, making light of the abuse)
  • Using children (e.g., threatening to take children, using children to relay messages)
  • Using privilege (e.g., treating you like a servant)
  • Economic abuse (e.g., preventing you from getting or keeping a job, making you ask for money)

SIGNS OF DOMESTIC ABUSE

  • Prevents or discourages you from going to work or school or seeing family members or friends
  • Tries to control how you spend your money, where you go, what medicines you take, or what you wear
  • Acts jealous or possessive or constantly accuses you of being unfaithful
  • Gets angry when drinking alcohol or using drugs
  • Threatens you with violence or a weapon
  • Hits, kicks, shoves, slaps, chokes, or otherwise hurts you, your children, or your pets
  • Forces you to have sex or engage in sexual acts against your will
  • Blames you for his or her violent behavior or tells you that you deserve it