Saying Sorry

While these are gestures to help you and/or the person you hurt feel better, it does not directly acknowledge the offense.

When to Let Go: Releasing the Past from the Present

The past is an important part of who we are. Our early upbringing, childhood memories, school experiences, first sexual encounters, relationships, and key decisions that shape our present self. Do you ever feel as if there are aspects of your past that are holding you back to being fully present?

You Are Not a Failure: When Relapse Occurs

Keeping in mind that relapse is common, it is so important to remain focused on recovery after a relapse.

When relapse occurs during the treatment of substance use disorders, it is an indication that additional support is needed. You are not a failure.

How to Talk About Recovery (If YOU Want)

There is incredible power in sharing one’s story. There are various characters that are part of story. The settings and plot change. There is a beginning, middle, and end as well as elements of conflict and resolution.

Kinds of Advocacy

Three kinds of advocacy include 1) self-advocacy 2) individual advocacy and 3) systems advocacy. Let’s spend some time getting to know the basics components of each.

What is Systems Advocacy?

Systems advocacy is focused on change of systems. This includes areas such as collecting and using data to influence research, funding, and advocacy that helps serve to be a collective voice, especially for those who are most vulnerable.

Managing Memories and Trauma

Safety and stabilization are a core component of trauma-related work. For individuals who have experienced trauma, memories may present as intrusive– showing up, repeatedly and without notice as a reminder to traumatic event (s).

Connecting After Quarantine

After getting used to staying at home, keeping social distance, and mask-wearing, relating to others after quarantine is another big adjustment. One question that often comes up is how-can-I-feel-less-nervous-socializing-after-quarantine?

Trauma Awareness and Treatment Options

The American Psychological Association (APA) defines trauma as a “an emotional response” to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. You may have directly experienced a terrible event, learned about a terrible event happening to a close friend/ family member, or had a frightening experience in which there was actual or threatened death, injury, or violence.

Supporting Someone with PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is not easy to live with, and it can be incredibly challenging to witness a loved one struggle with the different symptoms that make up this disorder.